Executive Pagan

If Eddie Izzard can be an executive transvestite, I can be an executive pagan.

New books about “The Odyssey”

Posted by Erik on January 14, 2009

I was in the library the other day and found not one, but two recent books about Homer’s Odyssey. The first (and the one I was actually there to get) is No-Man’s Lands: One Man’s Odyssey Through The Odyssey, by Scott Huler. The author became entranced with The Odyssey at about my age, and decided to take six months and retrace Odysseus’ journey.

The other, serendipitous find is Sailing Home: Using the Wisdom of Homer’s Odyssey to Navigate Life’s Perils and Pitfalls, by Zen teacher Norman Fischer. Apparently Fischer has been using stories from The Odyssey for years to help illustrate his teaching, and decided that there was a book in it.

I’m currently reading both; if I find either or both of them to be exceptionally good (or bad) I’ll report back!

About these ads

4 Responses to “New books about “The Odyssey””

  1. Serendipitous for me, too! Just this morning I was thinking about O Brother, Where Art Thou?, for no reason I could discern… Just enjoying remembering the movie. :-)

  2. R.D. Hammond said

    The other, serendipitous find is Sailing Home: Using the Wisdom of Homer’s Odyssey to Navigate Life’s Perils and Pitfalls, by Zen teacher Norman Fischer.

    O rly! Let’s look at the review from the link you provided:

    Norman Fischer deftly incorporates Buddhist, Judaic, Christian, and popular thought, as well as his own unique and sympathetic understanding of life, in his reinterpretation of Odysseus’s familiar wanderings as lessons that everyone can use.

    Sounds amazing. This is getting bought next paycheck and going directly to the table next to my bed.

  3. executivepagan said

    Jeff,
    Huler mentions O Brother in the intro to his book…

    R.D.,
    Hope you like it! I’m most of the way through the first chapter and so far it’s at least as good as most of the self-help books I’ve seen. I particularly like what he has to say about waiting as a stage in and of itself, and the value of living that stage rather than just trying to get through it.

  4. Hrafnkell said

    How fascinating! I’d love to retrace Odysseus’ journey. Another journey it would be fun to reproduce would be Pausanias’ tour of Greece. The Fischer book sounds interesting too. Two good finds for certain.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

 
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

%d bloggers like this: