Executive Pagan

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Ali on the Song of the World

Posted by Erik on August 4, 2009

Ali just posted something so lyrical, lovely and true that I have to share:

In Druidry, there is this idea that everything has a Song, and that the world, too, has a song. The Song of the World is something like a Divine or True Will, I suppose, and we join with it our own voices, the music of our bodies humming, pumping blood, inhaling and exhaling, neurons and nerves buzzing and vibrating. The air we move through shifts around us with every stride, and our laughing and crying shape it, too, creating leitmotifs, bridges and bass lines. When we sing and move and live in harmony with the World Song, our own songs are amplified, modulated and carried along–our lives become beautiful, our hearts become soft and permeable, our minds become nimble and familiar with the patterns of how things dance.

This idea–that we each have a song, a soul-song, and that everything, the landscape and the gods and the world itself, has a soul-song as well–underlies a kind of lovely animism that permeates everything, everywhere, and fills it utterly with life and movement. It bestows a special sacredness to space, to limits and the separation of necessary absence through which limited, finite beings move. The Song of the World offers us a way to understand our unity and community without sacrificing our individuality and uniqueness, our creativity and our freedom.

There’s more, of course – go and read! (There’s also a really cool video clip, as if you needed more encouragement…)

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2 Responses to “Ali on the Song of the World”

  1. R.D. Hammond said

    Stuff like this pings a solid 9.2 on my Interest-O-Meter. Now I’m curious to get my hands on some of the books being talked about in the post.

  2. executivepagan said

    Always happy to spread the fandom! Her archives are well worth reading as well, if (as it appears from your other comment) it’s your first time reading her.

    I haven’t had a chance to read Blood and Mistletoe yet, but since I know that it’s the expanded, more formally academic version of his book The Druids, that I have read, I feel safe in saying it’s a must-read.

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